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ARCHIVE: Alternatives (prior to Oct. 2005)

In June 2006, the highway and transit elements of the I-70 East Corridor were separated into two independent projects, reflecting that they serve different travel markets, are located in different corridors, and have different funding sources. Read more about the Project Separation on the Project Overview page.

ARCHIVE: Alternatives (prior to Oct. 2005)

arrow downMaintenance Facilities

arrow downDowning Transit Extension

arrow downDEIS Alternatives

arrow downDetailed Screening

arrow downDetailed Screening Alternatives

Maintenance Facilities

Members of the I-70 East Corridor EIS project team have met extensively with neighborhoods in Aurora, Boulder, and Denver concerning candidate sites for a maintenance facility for trains servicing the I-70 East Corridor rapid-transit line. Both commuter rail and light rail remain under consideration.

Corridor residents, business owners, and stakeholders were able to review and discuss information about maintenance facilities during the October 2005 Corridor-Wide Meetings (Meeting Minutes Archive).

Commuter Rail Maintenance Facilities

Five commuter rail maintenance facility sites remain under consideration. Candidate sites for commuter rail include:

bulletBurlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Rennick Yard

bulletBNSF Trailer on Flat Car (TOFC) Yard

bulletBNSF 31st Street Yard

bulletRTD District Shops/Platte Facility

bulletUnion Pacific (UP) 36th Street Yard West

Light Rail Maintenance Facilities

After the second level of screening was completed for light rail maintenance facility sites, nine sites remained. Due to the large number of remaining sites, additional analysis and screening was completed to compare the remaining sites to one another based on how well they meet specific criteria. The sites that were most effective at meeting the screening criteria are being carried forward as light rail maintenance facility candidate sites and will be fully evaluated in the DEIS. After the third level of screening, two sites remain under consideration. Recommendations from the additional analysis were presented at the October 2005 Corridor-Wide Meetings. A map of the light rail maintenance facility sites under consideration can be found here.

The selection of a maintenance facility site will not be made until the completion of the final EIS (FEIS), probably sometime in 2006 or 2007. All of the candidate sites are currently being fully evaluated and the findings will be disclosed in the DEIS, planned for public release in 2006. Additional information on maintenance facilities can be found by clicking the links below.

bulletRTD Rail Maintenance Facilities

bulletCommuter Rail Maintenance Facility Site Identification and Screening Results

bulletLight Rail Maintenance Facilities

Downing Transit Extension

Many different alternatives are being considered for the transit extension along Downing Street. The alternatives were developed based on input received from meetings held in the community this summer, as well as recommendations from the project team. The alternatives include enhanced bus service, streetcar, or light rail.

Additional information on the extension of transit on Downing Street can be found in the Meeting Minutes Archive.

DEIS Alternatives

In October 2005, the I-70 East Corridor EIS project team presented to the community the recommendations for the alternatives that will be fully evaluated in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). This information can be found in the Meeting Minutes Archive or by clicking on the links below:

bulletHighway Alternatives

- Highway DEIS Alternatives and No-Action Alternatives

- Alternative A

- Alternative B and Cross Street Access

- Alternative C

- Alternative D

- Realignment Connection Options

- Highway Operations

bulletTransit Alternatives

- Transit DEIS Alternatives and No-Action Alternative

- Alternative 1 - Commuter Rail

- Alternative 2 - Light Rail

- Station Types

- Transit Operations

Detailed Screening

In late February 2005, the I-70 East Corridor EIS project team presented to the community the recommendations for the alternatives that will be fully evaluated in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). This information can be found on the Meeting Minutes Archive page or can be found by clicking on the links below:

bulletHighway DEIS Alternatives

bulletRealignment Alternative Changes and Options

bulletTransit DEIS Alternatives

bulletCommuter Rail Central Maintenance Facility

bulletTransit and Highway No Action Alternatives

bulletHighway Alternatives Eliminated

bulletTransit Alternatives Eliminated

Alternative Categories

Numerous ideas have been suggested as solutions to the problems in the I-70 East Corridor. Alternatives have been developed based on input from the community and affected agencies during the scoping process, from previous studies, and new concepts developed by the project team. These alternatives have been divided into eight alternative categories including Interstate Alignments, Interchanges, Interstate Lane Types, Transit Alignments, Station Locations, Transit Technologies, Transportation Demand Management/Transportation System Management (TDM/TSM), and Local System Improvements.

Based on the first two levels of the alternative screening process, several alternatives within each alternative category have been eliminated from further consideration. These alternatives are shown in grey with an next to them. Several other alternatives by themselves will not solve the problems in the I-70 East Corridor, but could be combined with other alternatives to enhance the overall transportation. These alternatives are shown in grey with a next to them. Finally, the alternatives in black text are still being considered for additional evaluation.

Interstate Alignment Alternatives

Interstate alignment alternatives include the existing I-70 alignment and any other alternatives for the possible relocation of the interstate. Interstate alignment alternatives are divided into sections based on the different features along the corridor.

Section 1 - I-70 from I-25 to Brighton Boulevard

    • IA1: Existing I-70 vertical alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing vertical alignment. Minor changes in the vertical alignment could be made to meet design standards or provide access at interchanges.
    • IA2: Existing I-70 horizontal alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing horizontal alignment. Minor changes in the horizontal alignment could be made to add capacity or provide access to interchanges.
    • IA3: Lower I-70 below existing ground. Reconstruct I-70 below existing ground with the local streets crossing over I-70. 46th Avenue is rebuilt as a collector/distributor or frontage road system.

      Eliminated from consideration because of the environmental impacts of constructing a new alignment through the South Platte River.

    • IA4: Add a level to the viaduct. Add an additional level to the viaduct. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more construction issues. The viaduct was not designed for another level.

    • IA5: Enclose I-70. Cover I-70 with a roof. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.

      Eliminated from consideration because of construction issues.

    • IA6: Put I-70 at-grade. Reconstruct I-70 at existing ground level. 46th Avenue is rebuilt as a collector/distributor or frontage road system along reconstructed I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration based on the inability to provide access to the community across the new alignment and need to keep the alignment separated from the existing railroad tracks.

    • IA7: Triple level section of I-70 (below ground). Use three levels for I-70. Existing ground level would be for 46th Avenue. The first level below ground is for westbound I-70 traffic. The second level below ground is for eastbound I-70 traffic.

      Eliminated from consideration based on the environmental impacts of constructing a new alignment through the South Platte River and the need to keep the alignment above the existing railroad tracks.

    • IA8: I-70 tunnel. Construct the I-70 alignment below ground in a tunnel. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.

      Eliminated from consideration based on the environmental impacts of constructing a new alignment through the South Platte River and the inability to provide a connection back to the I-25/I-70 interchange.

    • IA9: I-70 above and below with 46th Avenue at ground level. Split the I-70 traffic with one direction traveling on an alignment below ground and the other direction elevated above ground with 46th Avenue at-grade in its current location.

      Eliminated from consideration based on the environmental impacts of constructing a new alignment through the South Platte River and the inability to provide a connection back to the I-25/I-70 interchange.

Section 2 - I-70 from Brighton Boulevard to Colorado Boulevard

    • IA10: Existing I-70 vertical alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing vertical alignment. Minor changes in the vertical alignment could be made to meet design standards or provide access at interchanges.
    • IA11: Existing I-70 horizontal alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing horizontal alignment. Minor changes in the horizontal alignment could be made to add capacity or provide access to interchanges.
    • IA12: Lower I-70 below existing ground. Reconstruct I-70 below existing ground with local streets crossing over I-70. 46th Avenue is rebuilt as a collector/distributor or frontage road system.
    • IA13: Add a level to the viaduct.Reconstruct the existing viaduct and add an additional level. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.
    • IA14: Enclose I-70. Cover I-70 with a roof. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.

      Eliminated from consideration because of construction issues.

    • IA15: Put I-70 at-grade. Reconstruct I-70 at existing ground level. 46th Avenue is rebuilt as a collector/distributor or frontage road system along reconstructed I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration because of the inability to provide access to community across new alignment, and need to keep the alignment separated from the existing railroad tracks.

    • IA16: Triple level section of I-70 (below ground). Use three levels for I-70. Existing ground level would be for 46th Avenue. The first level below ground is for westbound I-70 traffic. The second level below ground is for eastbound I-70 traffic.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more community and environmental impacts than other alternatives and there are other alternatives that better meet the project need.

    • IA17: I-70 tunnel. Construct the I-70 alignment below ground in a tunnel. 46th Avenue remains on its existing alignment.

      Eliminated from consideration because it creates additional safety concerns, has substantially higher construction and operations and maintenance costs, may be a higher security risk, affects the same amount of properties, and has the potential for disturbing or encountering soils or waters that may have elevated concentrations of heavy metals. Click to view the Reasons for Eliminating Tunnel Alternative between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard memo.

    • IA18: I-70 above and below with 46th Avenue at ground level. Split the I-70 traffic with one direction traveling on an alignment below ground and the other direction elevated above ground with 46th Avenue at-grade in its current location. Reconstruct the viaduct from Washington Street to Colorado Boulevard.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more construction issues than other alternatives and there are other alternatives that better meet the project need.

Section 3 - I-70 from Colorado Boulevard to I-270

    • IA19: Existing I-70 vertical alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing vertical alignment. Minor changes in the vertical alignment could be made to meet design standards or provide access at interchanges.
    • IA20: Existing I-70 horizontal alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing horizontal alignment. Minor changes in the horizontal alignment could be made to add capacity or provide access to interchanges.

Section 4 - I-70 from I-270 to I-22

    • IA21: Existing I-70 vertical alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing vertical alignment. Minor changes in the vertical alignment could be made to meet design standards or provide access at interchanges.
    • IA22: Existing I-70 horizontal alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing horizontal alignment. Minor changes in the horizontal alignment could be made to add capacity or provide access to interchanges.

Section 5 - I-70 from I-225 to Peña Boulevard

    • IA23: Existing I-70 vertical alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing vertical alignment. Minor changes in the vertical alignment could be made to meet design standards or provide access at interchanges.
    • IA24: Existing I-70 horizontal alignment. Reconstruct I-70 along the existing horizontal alignment. Minor changes in the horizontal alignment could be made to add capacity or provide access to interchanges.

Other

    • IA25: Improve I-270 and reclassify I-70. Convert the existing portion of I-70 from I-25 to I-270 to a limited access roadway. Additional capacity would be added to I-270 and I-76. The viaduct between Washington Street and Colorado Boulevard would be reconstructed or removed.

      Eliminating I-70 affects access to local businesses, residents, downtown and I-25.

    • IA26: Realign the I-70 westbound lanes north. Realign the westbound lanes of I-70 north of the National Western Complex from Colorado Boulevard to I-25. Eastbound lanes remain in the current I-70 location. The viaduct between Washington Street and Colorado Boulevard would be reconstructed or removed.

      Eliminated from consideration because of environmental and community impacts of constructing a new alignment through the Globeville and Elyria/Swansea neighborhoods.

    • IA27: Realign the I-70 eastbound lanes to Smith Road. Realign the eastbound lanes of I-70 to be adjacent to Smith Road. Westbound lanes remain in the current I-70 location. The viaduct between Washington Street and Colorado Boulevard would be reconstructed or removed.

      Eliminated from consideration because of environmental and community impacts of constructing a new alignment through the neighborhoods south of I-70.

    • IA28: Move I-70 to the North of Elyria & Swansea Neighborhoods (adjacent to rail alignment). Realign I-70 from Quebec Street to Brighton Boulevard to the north of the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods.
    • IA29: Move I-70 to the North of Elyria & Swansea Neighborhoods (along 52nd Avenue). Realign I-70 from Quebec Street to Brighton Boulevard to the north of the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. I-70 will follow 52nd Avenue to the north.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more potential community impacts than other I-70 realignment alternatives.

    • IA30: Move I-70 to the North of Elyria & Swansea Neighborhoods (along I-270/rail alignment). Realign I-70 to follow I-270 and the existing interchange and add a new interchange to realign I-70 the north of the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods. I-70 then will connect with the original I-70 alignment at Brighton Boulevard.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has potential environmental impacts and construction related issues than other I-70 realignment alternatives.

Interchange Alternatives

Interchange alternatives include existing and new locations to provide access to the interstate.

    • I1: I-25. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at I-25
    • I2: Washington Street. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Washington Street.
    • I3: Brighton Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Brighton Boulevard.
    • I4: York Street. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at York Street.
    • I5: Steele Street/Vasquez Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Steele Street/Vasquez Boulevard
    • I6: Colorado Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Colorado Boulevard.
    • I7: Dahlia Street. Improvements to the existing I-70 interchange that provides access to Dahlia Street
    • I8: Holly Street. Improvements to the existing I-70 interchange that provides access to Holly Street
    • I9: Monaco Street. Improvements to the existing I-70 interchange that provides access to Monaco Street
    • I10: Quebec Street. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Quebec Street
    • I11: I-270. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at I-270
    • I12: Havana Street. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Havana Street
    • I13: Peoria Street. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Peoria Street
    • I14: I-225. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at I-225
    • I15: Chambers Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Chambers Boulevard
    • I16: Peña Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Peña Boulevard
    • I17: Airport Boulevard. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Airport Boulevard.
    • I18: Tower Road. Improvements to the existing interchange on I-70 at Tower Road.
    • I19: Picadilly Road. Provide a new interchange on I-70 at Picadilly Road.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the purpose and need of the project and is addressed in another study.

    • I20: Central Park Boulevard. Provide a new interchange on I-70 at Central Park Boulevard.
    • I21: Additional access to Globeville area. Provide a new interchange on I-70 from the Globeville area

      Eliminated from consideration because a new access can not be provided given the spacing of the existing interchanges. Access to Globeville is provided through the existing Washington Street and Pecos Street interchanges. Federal guidelines state how close interchanges can be to each other. An interchange here would violate those guidelines.

    • I22: I-270/Quebec Street improvements. Combine the I-270 and Quebec Street accesses as an interchange system to provide access to and from I-70
    • I23: Eliminate accesses. Eliminate some of the existing interchanges on I-70.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • I24: Combine accesses. Combine some of the existing interchanges on I-70 into interchange systems.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

Interstate Lane Type Alternatives

Interstate lane types are described by who is allowed to use the lane. Lane types include general purpose lanes where anyone can use the lane to special purpose lanes where only certain users (e.g. buses) are allowed.

    • IL1: Dedicated lane for commuters. Lanes that are designated for through traffic traveling the corridor from I-25 to Peña Boulevard. Access is only provided at limited locations.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity or provide access to the corridor as well as other lane type alternatives.

    • IL2: Dedicated lane for DIA travelers. Lanes that are designated for travel on I-70 between I-25 and Peña Boulevard with entrance points provided only in the eastbound direction and exit points only in the westbound direction.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity or provide access to the corridor as well as other lane type alternatives.

    • IL3: Reversible expressway lane. Reversible travel lanes on I-70. Lanes would be opened to provide additional capacity for the direction of travel with the highest traffic volume.
    • IL4: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane. Lanes on I-70 that can only be used by vehicles with more than one person and/or buses.
    • IL5: Toll lane. Lanes that can only be used for a fee.
    • IL6: General purpose lane. Lanes that can be used by any driver or vehicle type.
    • IL7: Dedicated bus lane. Lanes that can only be used by buses.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity through the corridor as well as other lane type alternatives. Buses would still be able to use HOV lanes.

    • IL8: Dedicated truck lane. Lanes that can only be used by tractor-trailer trucks.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity through the corridor as well as other lane type alternatives. Trucks are a small percentage (approximately 10-14 percent) of the overall corridor volume.

    • IL9: Collector distributor (C-D) roads. A system of roads used to provide access to and from I-70 but are not located on the I-70 alignment.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • IL10: Emergency lane. Lanes that can only be used by emergency response vehicles (e.g. ambulances).

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity through the corridor as well as other lane type alternatives. Emergency response vehicles can use the special purpose lanes or shoulders for better access.

    • IL11: Frontage roads. A system of roads used to provide access to local streets and properties adjacent to the interstate. The Monaco/Holly/Dahlia system is an example of an area with frontage roads.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • IL12: Auxiliary lanes. Lanes before or after interchanges that allow traffic to speed up and slow down when entering and exiting I-70.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • IL13: Truck only ramps at Steele Street/ Vasquez Boulevard. Lanes for truck traffic only at the Steele Street/Vasquez Boulevard exit from I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not improve capacity through the corridor.

    • IL14: Braided ramps. A ramp type that allows drivers to merge between a collector/distributor or a frontage road system and the I-70 lanes.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • IL15: Dual divided highway. A highway system connecting two highways that is parallel but separate from I-70.
    • IL16: High Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes. Toll lanes where a fee is charged based upon current congestion levels on the highway.

Transit Alignment Alternatives

Transit alignment alternatives consist of various ways to provide mass transit between Downtown Denver and DIA. The transit alignments are divided into sections based on the different features along the corridor.

On-street Downtown Transit Alignments

    • TA19: Brighton Boulevard. Alignment from existing downtown light rail north along Broadway to Brighton Boulevard, along Brighton to an east-west alignment that then connects to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA4: Broadway Street. Alignment from existing downtown light rail north along Broadway to the Union Pacific corridor, or along Brighton Boulevard to I-70. The alignment then follows the UP or I-70 alignment that then connects to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA5: Washington Street. Alignment from existing downtown light rail north along Washington Street. The alignment then follows the UP or I-70 alignment that then connects to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more potential residential and historical property impacts and does not support community plans as well as other downtown transit alignments.

    • TA29: California Street. Extend the existing light rail along Downing Street and placing a track along California Street from Downtown to Downing Street. The alignment then follows an east-west alignment that then connects to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA30: Welton Street/Downing Street. Place a second track along Welton Street, extending the existing light rail along Downing Street to 40th Avenue. The alignment then follows an east-west alignment that then connects to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

Off-street East-West Transit Alignments

    • TA1: Along I-70 (in the ROW). Alignment from Denver Union Station north to I-70, east along I-70 to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA2: Existing Union Pacific tracks/Smith Road. Alignment from Denver Union Station along the existing UP corridor, east along UP corridor or Smith Road to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA31: BNSF Denver Market Lead. Alignment from Denver Union Station along the existing UP corridor to 40th Street, east along the BNSF Denver Market Lead corridor to Colorado Boulevard, then along the existing UP corridor or Smith Road to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

On-street East-West Transit Alignments

    • TA3: 35th Avenue. Alignment along Downing north from 30th and Downing, east along 35th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has more potential residential and business property impacts and does not support community plans as well as other on-street east-west transit alignments like Bruce Randolph/35th Avenue.

    • TA6: Martin Luther King Boulevard. Alignment along Downing north from 30th and Downing, east along MLK to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA9: Bruce Randolph/35th Avenue. Alignment along Downing north from 30th and Downing, east along Bruce Randolph until Dahlia, north on Dahlia to 35th Avenue, east on 35th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.
    • TA10: 38th Avenue. Alignment along Downing north from 30th and Downing, east along 38th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not provide access to local residences, businesses, or activity centers in the corridor as well as other on-street east-west transit alignments such as Martin Luther King and Bruce Randolph, since 38th Avenue runs through a primarily industrial area.

    • TA11: Montview Boulevard. Connection from another alternative south along Colorado Boulevard, then east along Montview Boulevard to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the project purpose and need of providing access to the study area.

    • TA7: Colfax Avenue. Alignment from existing downtown light rail south to Colfax, east along Colfax to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the project purpose and need of providing access to the study area.

    • TA13: Havana Street. Alignment that continues another proposed alignment north along Havana Street, then east along 56th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not provide access to local residences, businesses, or activity centers in the corridor as well as other transit alignments.

    • TA14: 56th Avenue/ North of 56th Avenue. Alignment from Denver Union Station north to 56th Avenue, east along 56th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not provide access to local residences, businesses, or activity centers in the corridor as well as other on-street east-west transit alignments. The alignment also does not fit within local plans to expand 56th Avenue.

    • TA15: 64th Avenue Median. Alignment from Denver Union Station north to 64th Avenue, east in the median of 64th Avenue to one of the airport connection transit alignments.

      Eliminated from consideration because of the potential environmental impacts of an alignment through the Rocky Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.

Airport Connection Transit Alignments

    • TA8: Tower Road. Alignment from an east-west transit alignment along Tower Road, then east to DIA.
    • TA12: Peña Boulevard. Alignment from an east-west transit alignment along Peña Boulevard, then east to DIA.
    • TA16: Run Further East of DIA. Alignment from DIA that would run towards Strasburg.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the purpose and need of this project because it is outside the study limits and does not provide access to the corridor.

    • TA17: Picadilly Road. Alignment from an east-west transit alignment along Picadilly Road, then east to DIA.
    • TA18: E-470. Alignment from an east-west transit alignment along E-470, then east to DIA.

      Eliminated from because it does not meet the purpose and need of this project because it is outside the study limits and does not provide access to the corridor.

Other Transit Alignments

    • TA20: Keep open the opportunity for connection to North Front Range area. An alignment that connects to an alternative to the North Front Range.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the purpose and need of this project because it is outside the study limits and does not provide access to the corridor. It is being looked at in a separate study.

    • TA21: 30th Avenue and Downing Street to 40th Avenue/40th Street. Extension of existing alignment north along Downing Street to 40th Avenue/40th Street.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA22: Downtown Brighton to National Western Complex. Connection from proposed alignments at 40th Avenue/40th Street along Brighton Boulevard to the National Western Complex.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA23: Connection between US 36 and I-70 before Denver Union Station. Connection from the US 36 transit alternative to an I-70 transit alternative north of Denver Union Station.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA24: From Montbello to downtown Denver to DIA. An alternative that connects Montbello to downtown and DIA.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA25: Connection to 40th Avenue/40th Street should be provided. A connection from any of the proposed alternatives to 40th Avenue/40th Street.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA26: Connection between I-225 and I-70 transit alternatives. Connection from an I-225 transit alternative to a potential I-70 transit alternative.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA27: Depressed alignment. A below existing ground alignment from Denver Union Station to DIA.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TA28: Elevated alignment. An above existing ground alignment from Denver Union Station to DIA.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

Station Location Alternatives

Station location alternatives are sites where access would be provided to a transit alignment. Like bus stops or train stops.

    • S1: Denver Union Station. Station location at Denver Union Station.
    • S2: Five Points Area. Station location in the Five Points Area.
    • S3: Blake Street. Station location on Blake Street.
    • S4: 33rd/Downing. Station location at 33rd and Downing.
    • S5: 31st Street. Station location on 31st Street.
    • S6: Cole Area. Station location in the Cole Area.
    • S7: 40th Avenue/40th Street. Station location at 40th Avenue/40th Street.
    • S8: National Western Complex. Station location at the National Western Complex.
    • S9: Globeville Area. Station location in the Globeville Area.
    • S10: Brighton Boulevard. Station location on Brighton Boulevard.
    • S11: Swansea/Globeville Area. Station location in the Swansea/Globeville Area.
    • S12: 47th/Brighton Boulevard. Station location at 47th/Brighton Boulevard.
    • S13: Swansea Area. Station location in the Swansea Area.
    • S14: York Street. Station location on York Street.
    • S15: Steele Street. Station location on Steele Street.
    • S16: Clayton Area. Station location in the Clayton Area.
    • S17: Northeast Denver. Station location in Northeast Denver.
    • S18: 40th Avenue/ Colorado Boulevard. Station location at 40th Avenue/Colorado Boulevard.
    • S19: Colorado Boulevard. Station location on Colorado Boulevard.
    • S20: Dahlia Street. Station location on Dahlia Street.
    • S21: Northeast Park Hill. Station location in Northeast Park Hill.
    • S22: Holly Street. Station location on Holly Street.
    • S23: Quebec Street. Station location on Quebec Street.
    • S24: Former Stapleton. Station location in Former Stapleton.
    • S25: Within Stapleton Development. Station location within the Stapleton Development.
    • S26: Havana Street. Station location on Havana Street.
    • S27: Smith Road/Peoria Street. Station location at Smith Road/Peoria Street.
    • S28: Fitzsimons. Station location in the Fitzsimons area.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the purpose and need of this project because it is outside the study limits and does not provide access to the corridor. This alternative will be considered in the I-225 Corridor Study that is being conducted by RTD.

    • S29: Gateway. Station location in Gateway.
    • S30: Peña Boulevard/Tower Road. Station location at Peña Boulevard/Tower Road.
    • S31: 40th Avenue/Peña Boulevard. Station location at 40th Avenue/Peña Boulevard.
    • S32: Airport Boulevard/Smith Road. Station location at Airport Boulevard/Smith Road.
    • S33: 68th/Tower Road. Station location at 68th/Tower Road.
    • S34: 56th/Tower Road. Station location at 56th/Tower Road.
    • S35: 48th/Tower Road. Station location at 48th/Tower Road.
    • S36: 45th/Tower Road. Station location at 45th/Tower Road.
    • S37: Smith Road/Tower Road. Station location at Smith Road/Tower Road.
    • S38: Denver International Airport (DIA). Station location at Denver International Airport (DIA).
    • S39: One to two miles apart with Park-n-Rides. Station locations one to two miles apart with Park-n-Rides.
    • S40: Ballpark Area. Station location in the Ballpark Area.
    • S41: Monaco Parkway. Station location on Monaco Parkway.

Transit Technology Alternatives

Transit technologies define how transit vehicles (e.g. buses, light rail, trains) operate including what type of engine they have (e.g. diesel, natural gas, electric) and what they ride on (e.g. rubber tires, steel wheels).

    • TT1: Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). BRT combines the concepts of rail transit and buses. It can operate in its own right of way, HOV lanes, or along city streets. BRT uses technologies such as intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and improved fare collection to make buses operate more efficiently.
    • TT2: Commuter rail. Commuter rail typically operates within freight rail right of way and serves longer distance trips. It may use locomotives with passenger cars or self-propelled passenger cars, known as diesel or electrical multiple units (DMUs or EMUs).
    • TT3: Heavy rail. Heavy rail is commonly referred to as metros or subways. Heavy rail usually provides medium capacity, medium speed service in densely populated urban areas on steel tracks in an exclusive right of way. Power is provided by a third rail alongside the track.

      Eliminated from consideration because it has limited flexibility for future improvements, than other transit technology alternatives, and it is not consistent with local and regional plans.

    • TT4: High speed rail (Bullet train). High-speed rail typically provides intercity service, operating on an exclusive guideway system of steel tracks that can be located at grade (usually existing rail lines), elevated, or below ground. Power is usually provided by overhead electrical cables.

      Eliminated from consideration because it is meant for longer distance trips and does not meet the purpose and need of providing access to the corridor.

    • TT5: Light rail. Light rail typically provides medium capacity, medium speed service in urban areas. Light rail can operate in its own right of way or along city streets. Power is generally provided by steel overhead electrical lines.
    • TT6: Magnetic levitation (MagLev). MagLev is an emerging technology that could provide high-speed service between major destinations, as well as long-distance intercity service. Trains float on a magnetic field and are propelled by magnets located on the guideway.

      Technology does not provide reasonable local access and is meant for longer trips.

    • TT7: Monorail. Monorail is elevated on a concrete or steel guideway and can be fully automated or driver-operated.

      Eliminated from consideration because it is not consistent with local and regional plans, it has limited flexibility for future improvements.

    • TT8: Personal Rapid Transit (PRT). PRT systems are designed to provide personalized service between specific origin and destination stations. PRT is an automated system of small vehicles that travel on elevated guideways and operate on demand with no intermediate stops.

      Technology has not been used in similar a situation and is not realistic for this application.

    • TT9: Sky tram. Self propelled vehicles using a suspended cable guideway (operations similar to LRT).

      Technology is not a realistic application for this corridor and is meant for shorter trips.

    • TT10: Street car/Trolley. Trolleys and streetcars share city streets to provide circulation or connector services on steel tracks in urban areas. Power is provided by overhead electrical cables. Many streetcars in operation are historic and serve as major tourist attractions.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT11: Alternative fueled transit vehicles. Buses that use non-fossil fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG), propane, and/or electricity for power.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT12: Bus feeder system. Type of system where local/circulator buses serve the neighborhood surrounding a mass transit alignment and/or a transit station.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT13: Call-n-Ride service. Curb-to-curb service that uses smaller buses and taxis and covers a specified geographic area. Passengers call RTD to request service and then a small bus or taxi picks up the passenger and delivers them to their destination within the service territory.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT14: Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU). Technology for commuter rail that uses diesel for fuel.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT15: Double decker buses. Two-level buses used extensively in England.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT16: Electric trains. Trains using electricity for their primary power source.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT17: Express buses. Type of bus that provides limited stops between origins and destinations to typically to serve longer distance trips.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • TT18: Local and express trains. Local trains stop at all designated stations along a corridor providing a high level of access; express trains stop at selected points providing a faster travel time between major origins and destinations in a corridor.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

Transportation Demand Management/Transportation System Management Alternatives

Transportation Demand Management/Transportation System Management (TDM/TSM) are programs designed to reduce travel demand and improve the use of the transportation system. TDM addresses traffic congestion by reducing travel demand rather than increasing transportation capacity. TSM strategies are designed to help improve traffic flow on the existing transportation system. Some examples of these are carpooling and traffic flow lights.

    • DS1: Improved pedestrian facilities. Improved pedestrian facilities allow users to walk to destinations.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS2: Improved bicycle facilities. Improved bicycle facilities allow users to bike to destinations, typically further away than users are willing to walk.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS3: Enhanced bus service. Create new bus services, modify existing bus routes, and/or increase bus frequencies.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS4: Ride sharing. Ride sharing programs allow travelers with common destinations to travel in one vehicle and share costs associated with traveling. Ride sharing programs reduce the total number of trips by reducing the number of single occupant vehicular trips. (DRCOG already has RideArrangers).

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS5: Vary business work schedules (Flex time). Flex time is a varied work schedule where employees may go to work later or earlier in the day to reduce travel during peak commuter travel periods.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS6: Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). ITS includes technology applications to move traffic more efficiently on the existing or an improved system.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS7: Freight transport management. Managing the freight traffic during peak commuter travel periods.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • DS8: Road pricing/ Congestion pricing. Pricing strategies that charge motorists to use a roadway, or portion of a roadway specifically during commuter travel periods.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

Local System Improvement Alternatives

Local system improvements are improvements that could serve as an alternative to I-70 or could be combined with other alternatives as an enhancement.

    • LS1: Connect I-76 to DIA. Create a connection between I-76 and Peña Boulevard

      Eliminated from consideration because of the potential environmental impacts through the Rocky Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.

    • LS2: Improve 56th Avenue. Improve 56th Avenue instead of adding capacity to I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration as a stand alone alternative to I-70 because it does not substantially effect the need to add capacity to I-70. Improving 56th Avenue to a 6-lane facility only reduces volumes on I-70 by 0-2 percent during peak hours and 0-1 percent daily. May be considered as an alternate route to I-70 during an accident on I-70.

    • LS3: Improve Smith Road. Improve Smith Road instead of adding capacity to I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration as a stand alone alternative because it does not substantially effect the need to add capacity to I-70. Improving Smith Road to a 4-lane facility only reduces volumes on I-70 by 0-9 percent during peak hours and 1-4 percent daily. May be considered as an alternate route to I-70 during an accident on I-70.

    • LS4: Improve 6th Avenue. Improve 6th Avenue instead of adding capacity to I-70.

      Eliminated from further consideration because it does not meet the purpose of the project of providing access to the study area.

    • LS5: Improve intersections where the railroad crosses. Implement safety improvements at locations where the railroads cross local streets.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • LS6: Extend Smith Road. Connect Smith Road through the former Stapleton area between Quebec Street and Havana Street

      This alternative was combined with LS3 in pre-screening and was eliminated in comparative screening when LS3 was eliminated. An extension of Smith Road is a planned improvement that will be completed as part of the Stapleton redevelopment.

    • LS7: Connect tolling options to E-470. Connect any tolling options along I-70 to E-470.

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • LS8: Remove through trucks from I-70. Divert through truck traffic from I-70 to I-270.

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not provide access to the corridor for the businesses and because I-70 is an interstate highway, trucks can not be restricted.

    • LS9: At-grade crossings. Remove the at-grade railroad crossings

      Not considered a stand alone alternative, may be combined with other alternatives as necessary to improve overall system operations.

    • LS10: Outer Loop. Create an additional interstate loop around Denver

      Eliminated from consideration because it does not meet the purpose of the project of addressing access along the corridor.

    • LS11: Improve I-270. Add additional capacity to I-270 with no capacity improvements to I-70.

      Eliminated from consideration as a stand alone alternative to I-70 because it does not substantially effect the need to add capacity to I-70. Improving I-270 to an 8-lane facility reduces volumes slightly on I-70 between I-25 and I-270, by 3-5 percent during peak hours, and 2 percent daily. The remainder of I-70 is unaffected. May be considered as an alternate route to I-70 during and accident on I-70.

Detailed Screening Alternatives

The alternatives that remained after the second level of evaluation, comparative screening, were combined to create several different corridor-wide interstate and transit alternatives. Interstate alignments, lane types, and interchange locations were combined to form interstate alternatives while transit alignments, station locations, and technologies were combined to form transit alternatives. These alternatives were developed for the third level of evaluation, detailed screening.

Interstate Alternatives

Six main interstate alternatives were evaluated in the detailed screening. Four options for the section of I-70 between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard were also analyzed. Three of the alternatives follow the existing I-70 horizontal alignment. The other three alternatives realign I-70 around the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods starting just east of Washington Street and connect back to I-70 near Quebec Street. Click the alternative names listed below to see a map of the alternative. Interstate alternatives include:

    • Alternative 1 - Add general purpose lanes (Add GP). This alternative includes one additional general purpose lane in each direction between I-25 and I-270 and between I-225 and Tower Road and two additional general purpose lanes are assumed between I-270 and I-225. The total laneage includes 8 lanes between I-25 and I-270, 12 lanes between I-270 and I-225, 8 lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard and 6 lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. A frontage road system is included between Colorado Boulevard and Quebec Street and a collector/distributor road system is included between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard.
    • Alternative 2 - Add high occupancy vehicle lanes (Add HOV). Alternative 2 includes the addition of two HOV lanes in each direction between I-25 and Peña Boulevard with no additional general purpose lanes. The total laneage includes 10 lanes between I-25 and I-270 (6 general purpose and 4 HOV), 12 lanes between I-270 and I-225 (8 general purpose and 4 HOV), 10 lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard (6 general purpose and 4 HOV), and 6 general purpose lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. A frontage road system is included between Colorado Boulevard and Quebec Street and a collector/distributor road system is included between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard. Access to and from the HOV lanes would be provided just east of I-25; near Colorado Boulevard; and at I-270, I-225, and Peña Boulevard.
    • Alternative 3 - Add toll lanes (Add Toll). This alternative includes the addition of two toll lanes in each direction between I-25 and Peña Boulevard with no additional general purpose lanes. The total laneage includes 10 lanes between I-25 and I-270 (6 general purpose and 4 toll), 12 lanes between I-270 and I-225 (8 general purpose and 4 toll), 10 lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard (6 general purpose and 4 toll), and 6 general purpose lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. A frontage road system is included between Colorado Boulevard and Quebec Street and a collector/distributor road system is included between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard. Access to and from the toll lanes would be provided just east of I-25; near Colorado Boulevard; and at I-270, I-225, and Peña Boulevard.
    • Alternative 4 - Realignment with general purpose lanes (Realignment GP). Alternative 4 includes 8 general purpose lanes between I-25 and I-270, 12 general purpose lanes between I-270 and I-225, 8 general purpose lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard and 6 general purpose lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. The realignment would leave existing I-70 just east of Washington Street and follow the east side of Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad and to the south and west sides of the Rock Island rail line around the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods and connect back into existing I-70 just west of Quebec Street. Existing 46th Avenue would be converted into a six-lane major arterial between Washington Street and Quebec Street. Access to the realignment would be provided at Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard. A frontage road is included on the south side of the realignment between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard and a collector-distributor road system is assumed between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard.
    • Alternative 5 - Realignment with HOV lanes (Realignment HOV). Alternative 5 includes 10 lanes between I-25 and I-270 (6 general purpose and 4 HOV), 12 lanes between I-270 and I-225 (8 general purpose and 4 HOV), 10 lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard (6 general purpose and 4 HOV), and 6 general purpose lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. The realignment would leave existing I-70 just east of Washington Street and follow the east side of BNSF railroad and to the south and west sides of the Rock Island rail line around the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods and connect back into existing I-70 just west of Quebec Street. Existing 46th Avenue would be converted into a six-lane major arterial between Washington Street and Quebec Street. Access to the realignment would be provided at Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard. A frontage road is included on the south side of the realignment between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard and a collector-distributor road system is assumed between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard. Access to and from the HOV lanes is the same as Alternative 2.
    • Alternative 6 - Realignment with toll lanes (Realignment Toll). This alternative includes 10 lanes between I-25 and I-270 (6 general purpose and 4 toll), 12 lanes between I-270 and I-225 (8 general purpose and 4 toll), 10 lanes between I-225 and Peña Boulevard (6 general purpose and 4 toll), and 6 general purpose lanes between Peña Boulevard and Tower Road. The realignment would leave existing I-70 just east of Washington Street and follow the BNSF railroad and Rock Island rail line around the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods and connect back into existing I-70 just west of Quebec Street. Existing 46th Avenue would be converted into a six-lane major arterial between Washington Street and Quebec Street. Access to the realignment would be provided at Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard. A frontage road is included on the south side of the realignment between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard/Vasquez Boulevard and a collector-distributor road system is assumed between Quebec Street and Peña Boulevard. Access to and from the toll lanes is the same as Alternative 3.

Interstate Vertical Alignment Options (Brighton Boulevard to Colorado Boulevard)

Four options were considered for the vertical alignment between Brighton Boulevard and Colorado Boulevard. The options are considered only for alternatives 1, 2, and 3.

    • Option A - Tunnel. Put I-70 in a tunnel with 46th Avenue above it.
    • Option B - Below grade. Put I-70 in a trench below its existing elevation with 46th Avenue adjacent to I-70.
    • Option C - Existing grade. Reconstruct I-70 at its current elevation (as a viaduct) with 46th Avenue below I-70.
    • Option D - At-grade. Lower I-70 to be at-grade with 46th Avenue adjacent to I-70.

For any of the options in section 2, the alignment could be shifted north or south. Shifting north means reconstructing the I-70 alignment all to the north by maintaining the existing southern right of way (ROW) boundary. Shifting south means reconstructing the I-70 alignment all to the south by maintaining the existing northern ROW boundary.

Transit Alternatives

Eight main transit alternatives were evaluated in the detailed screening. The alternatives follow various alignments between Denver Union Station (DUS) and Denver International Airport (DIA) and assume both on-street and separate right of way operations. Three types of technology were evaluated including bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail, and commuter rail. Along with these eight alternatives, four options and four alignment variations were analyzed. The options include different ways to access DIA and the variations are smaller deviations within the overall alignments. Click the alternative names listed below to see a map of the alternative. Transit alternatives include:

    • Alternative 1 - I-70 Bus Rapid Transit (I-70 BRT). This alternative includes running BRT in special purpose lanes in the median of I-70 to Peña Boulevard. To access DUS, the BRT runs either along Brighton Boulevard or I-25 to I-70. The BRT then runs in special purpose lanes in the median of I-70 to Peña Boulevard. At Peña Boulevard, the BRT uses Peña Boulevard general purpose lanes to DIA. Station locations include: DUS, Brighton Boulevard, Colorado Boulevard, Central Park Boulevard, Peoria Street, 40th Avenue/Airport Boulevard, 56th Avenue/Peña Boulevard, Tower Road/Peña Boulevard, DIA, Broadway Avenue/Blake Street (Brighton Boulevard only), and 38th Avenue (Brighton Boulevard only).
    • Alternative 2 - Union Pacific Commuter Rail (UP CR). This alternative includes running commuter along the Union Pacific (UP) Corridor starting at DUS and continuing west to Airport Boulevard where two options exist for connecting to DIA (Peña Boulevard or Telluride Road). Station locations include: DUS, 40th Avenue/40th Street, Colorado Boulevard, Central Park Boulevard, Peoria Street, DIA, and others based on different commuter rail options.
    • Alternative 3 - UP Light Rail Transit (UP LRT). This alternative includes running LRT adjacent to the UP Corridor starting at DUS and continuing west to Airport Boulevard where four options exist for connecting to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). This alternative includes the extension of light rail along Downing Street from the 30th Avenue/Downing Street station to the UP Corridor. Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, 40th Avenue/40th Street, Colorado Boulevard, Monaco Parkway, Central Park Boulevard, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, 33rd Avenue/Downing Street (Downing light rail extension), and others based on different light rail options and UP alignment variations.
    • Alternative 4 - UP BRT. This alternative includes running BRT on Wewatta Street to 23rd Street. At 23rd Street, the alignment turns south using 23rd Street to Market Street/Blake Street. The alignment uses Market Street/Blake Street to Broadway Avenue and then uses Broadway Avenue to the UP Corridor. The alignment then runs adjacent to the UP Corridor to Airport Boulevard where four options exist for connecting to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). This alternative includes the extension of light rail along Downing Street from the 30th Avenue/Downing Street station to the UP Corridor. Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, 40th Avenue/40th Street, Colorado Boulevard, Monaco Parkway, Central Park Boulevard, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, 33rd Avenue/Downing Street (Downing light rail extension), and others based on different BRT options and UP alignment variations.
    • Alternative 5 - Bruce Randolph Avenue (BR LRT). This alternative includes running LRT along the UP Corridor, crossing along 34th Street, and continuing east along Bruce Randolph Avenue to Dahlia Street. At Dahlia Street, the alignment turns south and connects to Martin Luther King Boulevard. The alignment then continues along Martin Luther King Boulevard and runs north along Ulster Street to the UP Corridor. Four options exist to connect to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). This alternative includes the extension of light rail along Downing Street from the 30th Avenue/Downing Street station to the UP Corridor. Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, York Street, Colorado Boulevard, Dahlia Street, Quebec Street, 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, and others based on different light rail options and Bruce Randolph alignment variations.
    • Alternative 6 - Bruce Randolph Avenue (BR BRT). This alternative includes running BRT on Wewatta Street to 23rd Street. At 23rd Street, the alignment turns south using 23rd Street to Champa Street and Stout Street depending on the direction of travel. The alignment uses Champa or Stout Street to connect to Bruce Randolph Avenue near Downing Street. The alignment then continues east along Bruce Randolph Avenue to Dahlia Street. At Dahlia Street, the alignment turns south and connects to Martin Luther King Boulevard. The alignment then continues along Martin Luther King Boulevard and runs north along Ulster Street to the UP Corridor. Four options exist to connect to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, York Street, Colorado Boulevard, Dahlia Street, Quebec Street, 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, and others based on different BRT options and Bruce Randolph alignment variations.
    • Alternative 7 - Martin Luther King Boulevard (MLK LRT). This alternative includes running LRT along the UP Corridor, crossing along 33rd Street, and continuing east along Martin Luther King Boulevard to Ulster Street. The alignment then turns north along Ulster Street to the UP Corridor. Four options exist to connect to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). This alternative includes the extension of light rail along Downing Street from the 30th Avenue/Downing Street station to the UP Corridor. Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, York Street, Colorado Boulevard, Holly Street, Quebec Street, 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, others based on different light rail options and Martin Luther King alignment variations.
    • Alternative 8 - Martin Luther King Boulevard (MLK BRT). This alternative includes running BRT on Wewatta Street to 33rd Street. At 33rd Street, the alignment turns south using 33rd Street to Champa Street and Stout Street depending on the direction of travel. The alignment uses Champa or Stout Street to connect to Martin Luther King Boulevard at Downing Street. The alignment then continues west along Martin Luther King Boulevard to Ulster Street. The alignment then turns north along Ulster Street to the UP Corridor. Four options exist to connect to DIA (Peña Boulevard, Telluride Road, Tower Road, and Picadilly Road). Station locations include: DUS, 33rd Street/UP Corridor, York Street, Colorado Boulevard, Holly Street, Quebec Street, 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Peoria Street, Chambers Road, DIA, and others based on different light rail options and Martin Luther King alignment variations.

Transit DIA Connection Options

For alternatives 2 through 8, there are four options to connect from the UP Corridor to DIA. They include:

    • Option A - Peña Boulevard. The alignment runs along the eastern and southern edge of the Peña Transportation Corridor crossing E-470 just south of the E-470/Peña Boulevard Interchange. The alignment then runs north along Picadilly Road to 78th Avenue. The alignment then continues east along 78th Avenue and turns north to connect to the first level of the DIA terminal. This option can be used with seven of the eight transit alternatives (Alternatives 2 through 8). Alternative 1 uses the general purpose lanes on Peña Boulevard to DIA. Station locations include: 40th Avenue/Airport Boulevard, 56th Avenue/Peña Boulevard (light rail and BRT only), Tower Road/Peña Boulevard, and DIA.
    • Option B - Telluride Road. The alignment runs along the future Telluride Road alignment to the southern edge of the Peña Transportation Corridor crossing E-470 just south of the E-470/Peña Boulevard Interchange. The alignment then runs north along Picadilly Road to 78th Avenue. The alignment then continues east along 78th Avenue and turns north to connect to the first level of the DIA terminal. This option can be used with all alternatives except Alternative 1. Station locations include: 48th Avenue, 64th Avenue, and DIA.
    • Option C - Tower Road. The alignment runs along Tower Road north of I-70 to the southern edge of the Peña Transportation Corridor crossing E-470 just south of the E-470/Peña Boulevard Interchange. The alignment then runs north along Picadilly Road to 78th Avenue. The alignment then continues east along 78th Avenue and turns north to connect to the first level of the DIA terminal. This option can be used with Alternatives 3 through 8. Station locations include: Airport Boulevard/UP Corridor, 48th Avenue, 64th Avenue, and DIA.
    • Option D - Picadilly Road. The alignment runs along Picadilly Road north of I-70 and then crosses E-470 to 78th Avenue. The alignment then continues east along 78th Avenue and turns north to connect to the first level of the DIA terminal. This option can be used with Alternatives 3 through 8. Station locations include: Airport Boulevard/UP Corridor, 38th Avenue, 56th Avenue, 64th Avenue, and DIA.

Transit Alignment Variations

Depending on the alternative there are a few possible alignment variations that were analyzed. These variations include:

    • Variation m - Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Market Lead. This variation leaves the UP Corridor just west of York Street and connects back to the UP Corridor at Colorado Boulevard. This variation can only be used with Alternatives 3 and 4. Station locations include: Steele Street.
    • Variation sq - Stapleton Access along Quebec Street. This variation leaves the UP Corridor and follows Quebec Street south and then continues east along Martin Luther King Boulevard, 33rd Avenue, and Sand Creek Parkway to Peoria Street. The alignment then continues north along Peoria Street to connect back to the UP Corridor. This variation can only be used with Alternatives 3 and 4. Station locations include: 35th Avenue/Quebec Street, 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Havana Street/Martin Luther King Boulevard, and 28th Avenue/Peoria Street.
    • Variation su - Stapleton Access along Ulster Street. This variation leaves the UP Corridor and follows Ulster Street south and then continues east along 33rd Avenue and Sand Creek Parkway to Peoria Street. The alignment then continues north along Peoria Street to connect back to the UP Corridor. This variation can only be used with Alternatives 3 and 4. Station locations include: 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Havana Street/Martin Luther King Boulevard, and 28th Avenue/Peoria Street.
    • Variation sp - UP Access along Peoria Street. This variation stays on Martin Luther King Boulevard east along Sand Creek Parkway to Peoria Street. The alignment then continues north along Peoria Street to connect back to the UP Corridor. This variation can only be used with Alternatives 5 through 8. Station locations include: 33rd Avenue/Ulster Street, Havana Street/Martin Luther King Boulevard, and 28th Avenue/Peoria Street.

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